The largest natural area in Switzerland
National Park

The Swiss National Park

The Swiss National Park in the Engadine is the largest nature area in Switzerland and the oldest national park in the Alps. Here, nature is still nature and man only plays a minor role. The flora and fauna alone are fascinatingly beautiful and if you are lucky, you may see stone deer, roe deer, snow hare or perhaps even a bearded vulture during your visit to the national park.

Nature at its purest at Swiss National Park

The largest natural area in Switzerland

The Swiss National Park is a unique natural oasis where all natural processes can take effect without restriction. Founded in 1914, it is the oldest national park in the Alps. It's the largest wilderness area in Switzerland and comprises 170 km2 of unspoilt natural landscape with 100 km of marked hiking trails.

Protection, research & information 

The national park pursues three goals: Nature conservancy, research and information. In other words, in the Swiss National Park, nature does its work. Man stands in the background as an observer and witnesses the dynamic processes that give this Alpine landscape its incomparable character. Animals, plants, habitats and natural processes have been protected here from human influences for over 100 years.

A visitor-friendly nature experience

Visitors are not allowed to leave the marked paths. As a result, the animals get used to people and observations can occur even at short distances. Those who follow the rules of conduct might observe stone deer, red deer, chamois, marmots, roe deer, snow hare, lizards, snakes, insects and many birds. You might even get to see one of the bearded vultures that were reintroduced to the park in 1991.

At the visitor centre in Zernez you can get information about the park, visit a walk-in marmot burrow or learn about special natural phenomena in the park area. There is a permanent exhibition on an area of 680 m2. In addition, a new special exhibition awaits visitors every year. Until 27 May 2020 this is: "The wolf is here. A human exhibition."